Training For Gynaecology — Basic Advice

Among the challenges women seeking abortion face include inequitable access, a lack of trained staff, stigmatisation, and a culture of exceptionalism, explains Dr Sandy Goldbeck-Wood, editor in chief of the journal, and clinical lead for abortion services at Cambridge University Hospitals. She argues that “problems of access and stigma, familiar worldwide, are compounded in the UK by an abortion law that is now widely seen as not fit for purpose” which is considered to be “out of step with technical advances in safe medical abortion and current UK social values.” Most women believe they have a right to make their own decision about abortion, but British law still requires the identification of serious physical or mental health risk by two doctors not necessarily qualified, and who may not know the woman personally. The law is, therefore, widely seen by clinicians as “hypocritical andanachronistic,” explains Dr Goldbeck-Wood. Another problem is that abortion care has become artificially separated from the rest of reproductive health care, she adds. In the UK, a high proportion of abortion care is provided in specialist organisations outside the NHS. Trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology – among them the potential service providers of the future – have too little opportunity to benefit from the learning environment that abortion care offers. “As well as reinforcing stigma, this deprives trainees of valuable learning opportunities,” she says Organisations calling for the law to be reformed include the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Midwives and other women’s health organisations. And if the law is to be reformed, says Dr Goldbeck-Wood, there will be a strong need for debate which is respectful and acknowledges the ethical complexity in this sensitive area of health care. “Abortion care remains a high-volume, under-researched and under-integrated area of women’s healthcare,” she writes. “2017 is an excellent time for practitioners to be challenging hypocrisy and exceptionalism in UK abortion care, and leading respectful debate centred on women’s needs, with complexity acknowledged.” A study led by Dr Louise Keogh, from the University of Melbourne, assessed the decriminalisation of abortion in the Victoria state of Australia in 2008. It found that a change in the law has empowered women, and increased clarity and safety for clinicians, but has failed to address stigma, access to services and workforce sustainability.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/b-aci122116.php

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✦ How do I reduce the swelling in my legs? There is a “glow” on her face almost all the time. Explosives: Silver nitrate is also used in different explosives, which include silver fulminate, silver acetylide, and silver abide. Cauterizing Agent: AgNO3 is used as a cauterization agent for procedures, which are used to remove warts. A vet performs pet care tasks; out of which a few are vaccination, wound dressing, treating fractures, dental treatments, and so on. Endometrial ablation procedure involves destruction of the endometrium that lines the uterus. The nutrition is normally administered by intravenous means, especially if the patient is feeling nauseous. ✦ Is premature delivery hereditary? There are several reasons that cause this symptom, which make it challenging to trace the root cause of the pain. view it nowWhen one has vision-related issues, the first step taken is to approach an optometrist who is an expert in the field of eye disorders. When the woman feels better after a few hours, the doctor will allow her discharge.

The parts for the programmable-logic control board Devonshire built in the summer have a retail price of about $20,000, but thanks to hardware discounts and software donations from Siemens, students were able to build six such devices for less than $5,000. Amanda Beaton, Siemens U.S. manager for the companys cooperative education program, flew from Atlanta to Oklahoma City one Thursday to receive Francis Tuttles outstanding industry partner award. Ware said students like Devonshire get hands-on experience building with donated equipment and are able to take practice tests free. Beaton said her company developed the training curriculum and certification tests because Siemens clients wanted assurance that potential employees understand how to use the equipment, according to The Journal Record (http://bit.ly/2hWJf7x ). http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=share&v=Pf7JuJcVzQUPLC machinery is used to control manufacturing machinery and to monitor and control oil and gas operations at well sites. Beaton said Siemens spent $1 million in its education partnership program nationwide with about 400 schools. About 75 percent of the educational institutions are two-year career-tech centers like Francis Tuttle. The tech center was the first in the nation to receive Siemens training, she said. Other industry groups partner with Francis Tuttle to help train the next generation of workers. The Oklahoma Energy Resources Board provides free tuition for petroleum industry classes there.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/dec/26/oklahoma-schools-get-industry-help-for-future-work/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS

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